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BULLISH CRYPTO REGULATIONS FROM SEC & OCC - Brian Brooks Banks Stablecoins - Bitfarms Bitcoin Mining

BULLISH CRYPTO REGULATIONS FROM SEC & OCC - Brian Brooks Banks Stablecoins - Bitfarms Bitcoin Mining submitted by PrimeCoinz to CryptoMarkets [link] [comments]

BULLISH CRYPTO REGULATIONS FROM SEC & OCC - Brian Brooks Banks Stablecoins - Bitfarms Bitcoin Mining

submitted by PrimeCoinz to DigitalAssets [link] [comments]

SECRET BRIAN BROOKS GREAT BANKING RESET! REGULATION FOR BITCOIN XRP & AL...

SECRET BRIAN BROOKS GREAT BANKING RESET! REGULATION FOR BITCOIN XRP & AL... submitted by RonCBrown to u/RonCBrown [link] [comments]

Bahamas Lançará seu CBDC em Outubro, Brian Brooks da OCC deu Sinal Verde para XRP e VET - Dicas sobre Bitcoin - mais rápido dinheiro

submitted by infocryptocoins to CertificadoDigital [link] [comments]

BULLISH CRYPTO REGULATIONS FROM SEC & OCC - Brian Brooks Banks Stablecoins - Bitfarms Bitcoin Mining

BULLISH CRYPTO REGULATIONS FROM SEC & OCC - Brian Brooks Banks Stablecoins - Bitfarms Bitcoin Mining submitted by PrimeCoinz to Crypto_Currency_News [link] [comments]

BULLISH CRYPTO REGULATIONS FROM SEC & OCC - Brian Brooks Banks Stablecoins - Bitfarms Bitcoin Mining

BULLISH CRYPTO REGULATIONS FROM SEC & OCC - Brian Brooks Banks Stablecoins - Bitfarms Bitcoin Mining submitted by PrimeCoinz to ThinkingCrypto [link] [comments]

BULLISH CRYPTO REGULATIONS FROM SEC & OCC - Brian Brooks Banks Stablecoins - Bitfarms Bitcoin Mining

BULLISH CRYPTO REGULATIONS FROM SEC & OCC - Brian Brooks Banks Stablecoins - Bitfarms Bitcoin Mining submitted by cryptoallbot to cryptoall [link] [comments]

Brian Brooks from Coinbase is now at the Office of the Comptroller of the Currency, the regulator for banks. Good: he wants national charters and not just state charters. Bad: he's still high on bitcoin fumes.

Brian Brooks from Coinbase is now at the Office of the Comptroller of the Currency, the regulator for banks. Good: he wants national charters and not just state charters. Bad: he's still high on bitcoin fumes. submitted by dgerard to Buttcoin [link] [comments]

Objectivism: The Philosophy of Ayn Rand with Yaron Brook — What Bitcoin Did

Objectivism: The Philosophy of Ayn Rand with Yaron Brook — What Bitcoin Did submitted by mccormack555 to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Objectivism: The Philosophy of Ayn Rand with Yaron Brook — What Bitcoin Did (x-post from /r/Bitcoin)

Objectivism: The Philosophy of Ayn Rand with Yaron Brook — What Bitcoin Did (x-post from /Bitcoin) submitted by ASICmachine to CryptoCurrencyClassic [link] [comments]

'Innovation districts' video by the Brooking Institute (a high profile research organization), if we can get many bitcoin business in the same area and create a BCH ecosystem it can be taken as a model and used in other places. All we need is one successful Bitcoin based ecosystem.

'Innovation districts' video by the Brooking Institute (a high profile research organization), if we can get many bitcoin business in the same area and create a BCH ecosystem it can be taken as a model and used in other places. All we need is one successful Bitcoin based ecosystem. submitted by zcc0nonA to btc [link] [comments]

'Innovation districts' video by the Brooking Institute (a high profile research organization), if we can get many bitcoin business in the same area and create a BCH ecosystem it can be taken as a model and used in other places. All we need is one successful Bitcoin based ecosystem.

'Innovation districts' video by the Brooking Institute (a high profile research organization), if we can get many bitcoin business in the same area and create a BCH ecosystem it can be taken as a model and used in other places. All we need is one successful Bitcoin based ecosystem. submitted by ABitcoinAllBot to BitcoinAll [link] [comments]

'Innovation districts' video by the Brooking Institute (a high profile research organization), if we can get many bitcoin business in the same area and create a BCH ecosystem it can be taken as a model and used in other places. All we need is one successful Bitcoin based ecosystem.

'Innovation districts' video by the Brooking Institute (a high profile research organization), if we can get many bitcoin business in the same area and create a BCH ecosystem it can be taken as a model and used in other places. All we need is one successful Bitcoin based ecosystem. submitted by cryptoanalyticabot to cryptoall [link] [comments]

Robinhood vs. The Paywall

Paywalls are, technologically speaking, quite fragile. In fact, as of today, if you are quick enough at the keyboard, you can easily copy the full text of a New York Times article before the Javascript kicks in and trims it.
I do this sometimes and I have a fast machine and a fast internet connection, which should make it harder. Other sites are more clever, but for the most part, paywalls are still a bit of a joke.
However, they're getting a lot better and more prevalent. I can imagine that right now an engineer at NYT is working on a better paywall with no practical way of cheating it.
All that aside, an article is just a piece of ordered text and some formatting, and I don't see that changing any time soon. Once you're past the paywall, the text just sits there in your browser, or in your email, or whatever. It can be viewed, copied, pasted, or read by a 3rd party extension.
What would it take, practically speaking, to "Robinhood" that text and make it freely available to everyone whether or not they've paid for it? There are numerous ways to access paywalled content today, which I won't share but aren't hard to find. But I'm interested in whether or not there is a solution that is so robust that it backs publishers into a corner where they need to find another way to make money. And when I say "robust" I mostly mean "legal", because I am assuming that any illegal method would ultimately lose out in a game of legal whack-a-mole (think torrent trackers or darknet markets).
Anyways, some initial considerations...
  1. You'd have to have at least one participant who has access to the paywalled content, but ideally many more than that who can all participate in tossing the content back over the paywall.
  2. You would need to have an immutable and accessible place to put the paywalled content so that other people could point their browsers to that location and see the same content that they would if they were looking at the source.
  3. As noted, you'd want to eliminate as much legal risk as possible. That goes for both the content "suppliers" and the content "consumers" (or, Robinhood and those he gives to).
I am not sure exactly what would happen if I just started copying and pasting paywalled content on, say, Reddit, but I am pretty sure it would catch up with me eventually because I am explicitly re-publishing. This solution would need to be so foolproof that it would put those who would otherwise enforce against it in an untenable position.
So, bear with me, here's what I want to know: how flawed, immoral, antisocial, and generally lacking is the following idea? My suspicion is that it is a pretty bad idea and is also pretty naive, but it's still been fun to think about and maybe some of you would like to discuss it. I am interested in any implications that come to mind.
~
The idea:
If you want to participate in this scheme, you install a browser extension. If you have access to any paywalled content, then every time you visit a page and view that content, the browser extension grabs the text and compresses it to its smallest possible representation.
Next, the browser extension make the smallest possible arbitrary transaction on the blockchain (looks to be about $0.06 currently), and stores as much of the article as it can fit in the OP_RETURN field, which is basically just a blank field for arbitrary text and currently has a size limit of 256 bytes (Note: There are tons of similar ways to accomplish the same thing, any many better blockchains for this use case. I just don't really keep up with the smaller blockchains and think that we can use the Bitcoin blockchain as a simple way to demonstrate the idea).
It may take a few transactions to store an entire article, but once it's part of the blockchain, it's there forever, and anyone who would want to subsequently view that article would only need to have access to the indices of the transactions and software that can de-compress the OP_RETURN values and reconstruct the article. I imagine this would also happen in the browser extension.
In this way, it's a lot like private torrent trackers. Everybody shares what they have access to, and the pieces of data that comprise the underlying media fly around the network freely. The software client is responsible for piecing them together and making the data cohesive for a given end user.
Today, a torrent client is completely legal, but having pirated media on your computer is not. Also, I'm pretty sure that opening your media collection to peers is also illegal, but I'm not actually sure.
Using the blockchain as the storage mechanism changes the calculus a little bit. You're not storing any pirated data on your machine, rather, you are stashing bits and pieces of it in a decentralized ledger, which nobody owns, meaning that nobody is really accountable for it. It's also impossible to take down.
The question of legality here is something like "are you allowed to include copyrighted works in transaction text on the blockchain?". And if not, how many chunks would the article need to be broken apart into to make it no long "The Article", but rather just pieces of arbitrary data which, if put together in the right order, would happen to reproduce "The Article"? Someone who is more knowledgable than I am would need to chime in here.
~
I wanted to get a sense of if this is even practical so I grabbed the text from a NYT article called "Opinion | No, the Democrats Haven’t Gone Over the Edge" by David Brooks.
After running the text through 1000 rounds of compression I got it down to 2702 bytes. The current OP_RETURN size limit for a BTC transaction is 256 bytes, so you would need to make around 10 transactions to store this single article.
And each transaction has a fee that goes to miners, which appears to be around 128 satoshis/byte according to https://privacypros.io/tools/bitcoin-fee-estimato
The BTC sent in a given transaction is recoverable, because it could be sent to a wallet that is owned by the sender, but the fees are unavoidable. Given the current rate, storing a NYT Opinion article on the Bitcoin blockchain, forever, would cost about 2707 * 128 Satoshis, or roughly $37.
So my immediate thought is wow that's expensive. I also know that it's frowned upon by the Bitcoin community and would be perceived as antagonistic by the miners. But my guess is that there's a better way to accomplish the same thing (again, off-chain transactions or using a totally different blockchain such as Ethereum, or BSV).
In fact, in "The unfuckening of OP_RETURN", Shadders shows that one can practically store up to 100kb of text in a given BSV transaction (BSV is a fork of bitcoin, which aims to align more with Satoshi's "original" vision).
The result of Shadders experiment? Well, here's the complete prequel to "Alice and Wonderland" in a single transaction, on the blockchain, forever: https://whatsonchain.com/tx/ef21e71d00b9fce174222e679640b09e29ac8a55f321c93e64b16cc3109959f8
Good thing Alice and Wonderland is in the public domain, right? Or... should it even matter what's "public" and what's "paywalled"?
What do you think?
submitted by mrctte to TheMotte [link] [comments]

Brookings: Venezuela’s Petro Undermines Legitimate Cryptocurrencies #bitcoin https://t.co/08n0CoYEeL - Crypto Insider Info - Whales's

Posted at: March 15, 2018 at 04:58AM
By:
Brookings: Venezuela’s Petro Undermines Legitimate Cryptocurrencies #bitcoin https://t.co/08n0CoYEeL
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Petro da Venezuela poderia prejudicar o ecossistema de criptomoedas, diz Brookings - Studio Bitcoin

Petro da Venezuela poderia prejudicar o ecossistema de criptomoedas, diz Brookings - Studio Bitcoin submitted by studiobitcoin to BitcoinBrasil [link] [comments]

A criticism of the article "Six monetarist errors: why emission won't feed inflation"

(be gentle, it's my first RI attempt, :P; I hope I can make justice to the subject, this is my layman understanding of many macro subjects which may be flawed...I hope you can illuminate me if I have fallen short of a good RI)
Introduction
So, today a heterodox leaning Argentinian newspaper, Ambito Financiero, published an article criticizing monetarism called "Six monetarist errors: why emission won't feed inflation". I find it doesn't properly address monetarism, confuses it with other "economic schools" for whatever the term is worth today and it may be misleading, so I was inspired to write a refutation and share it with all of you.
In some ways criticizing monetarism is more of a historical discussion given the mainstream has changed since then. Stuff like New Keynesian models are the bleeding edge, not Milton Friedman style monetarism. It's more of a symptom that Argentinian political culture is kind of stuck in the 70s on economics that this things keep being discussed.
Before getting to the meat of the argument, it's good to have in mind some common definitions about money supply measures (specifically, MB, M1 and M2). These definitions apply to US but one can find analogous stuff for other countries.
Argentina, for the lack of access to credit given its economic mismanagement and a government income decrease because of the recession, is monetizing deficits way more than before (like half of the budget, apparently, it's money financed) yet we have seen some disinflation (worth mentioning there are widespread price freezes since a few months ago). The author reasons that monetary phenomena cannot explain inflation properly and that other explanations are needed and condemns monetarism. Here are the six points he makes:
1.Is it a mechanical rule?
This way, we can ask by symmetry: if a certainty exists that when emission increases, inflation increases, the reverse should happen when emission becomes negative, obtaining negative inflation. Nonetheless, we know this happens: prices have an easier time increasing and a lot of rigidity decreasing. So the identity between emission and inflation is not like that, deflation almost never exists and the price movement rhythm cannot be controlled remotely only with money quantity. There is no mechanical relationship between one thing and the other.
First, the low hanging fruit: deflation is not that uncommon, for those of you that live in US and Europe it should be obvious given the difficulties central banks had to achieve their targets, but even Argentina has seen deflation during its depression 20 years ago.
Second, we have to be careful with what we mean by emission. A statement of quantity theory of money (extracted from "Money Growth and Inflation: How Long is the Long-Run?") would say:
Inflation occurs when the average level of prices increases. Individual price increases in and of themselves do not equal inflation, but an overall pattern of price increases does. The price level observed in the economy is that which leads the quantity of money supplied to equal the quantity of money demanded. The quantity of money supplied is largely controlled by the [central bank]. When the supply of money increases or decreases, the price level must adjust to equate the quantity of money demanded throughout the economy with the quantity of money supplied. The quantity of money demanded depends not only on the price level but also on the level of real income, as measured by real gross domestic product (GDP), and a variety of other factors including the level of interest rates and technological advances such as the invention of automated teller machines. Money demand is widely thought to increase roughly proportionally with the price level and with real income. That is, if prices go up by 10 percent, or if real income increases by 10 percent, empirical evidence suggests people want to hold 10 percent more money. When the money supply grows faster than the money demand associated with rising real incomes and other factors, the price level must rise to equate supply and demand. That is, inflation occurs. This situation is often referred to as too many dollars chasing too few goods. Note that this theory does not predict that any money-supply growth will lead to inflation—only that part of money supply growth that exceeds the increase in money demand associated with rising real GDP (holding the other factors constant).
So it's not mere emission, but money supply growing faster than money demand which we should consider. So negative emission is not necessary condition for deflation in this theory.
It's worth mentioning that the relationship with prices is observed for a broad measure of money (M2) and after a lag. From the same source of this excerpt one can observe in Fig. 3a the correlation between inflation and money growth for US becomes stronger the longer data is averaged. Price rigidities don't have to change this long term relationship per se.
But what about causality and Argentina? This neat paper shows regressions in two historical periods: 1976-1989 and 1991-2001. The same relationship between M2 and inflation is observed, stronger in the first, highly inflationary period and weaker in the second, more stable, period. The regressions a 1-1 relationship in the high inflation period but deviates a bit in the low inflation period (yet the relationship is still there). Granger causality, as interpreted in the paper, shows prices caused money growth in the high inflation period (arguably because spending was monetized) while the reverse was true for the more stable period.
So one can argue that there is a mechanical relationship, albeit one that is more complicated than simple QTOM theory. The relationship is complicated too for low inflation economies, it gets more relevant the higher inflation is.
Another point the author makes is that liquidity trap is often ignored. I'll ignore the fact that you need specific conditions for the liquidity trap to be relevant to Argentina and address the point. Worth noting that while market monetarists (not exactly old fashioned monetarists) prefer alternative explanations for monetary policy with very low interest rates, this phenomena has a good monetary basis, as explained by Krugman in his famous japanese liquidity trap paper and his NYT blog (See this and this for some relevant articles). The simplified version is that while inflation may follow M2 growth with all the qualifiers needed, central banks may find difficulties targeting inflation when interest rates are low and agents are used to credible inflation targets. Central banks can change MB, not M2 and in normal times is good enough, but at those times M2 is out of control and "credibly irresponsible" policies are needed to return to normal (a more detailed explanation can be found in that paper I just linked, go for it if you are still curious).
It's not like monetary policy is not good, it's that central banks have to do very unconventional stuff to achieve in a low interest rate environment. It's still an open problem but given symmetric inflation targeting policies are becoming more popular I'm optimistic.
2 - Has inflation one or many causes?
In Argentina we know that the main determinant of inflation is dollar price increases. On that, economic concentration of key markets, utility price adjustments, fuel prices, distributive struggles, external commodity values, expectatives, productive disequilibrium, world interest rates, the economic cycle, stationality and external sector restrictions act on it too.
Let's see a simple example: during Macri's government since mid 2017 to 2019 emission was practically null, but when in 2018 the dollar value doubled, inflation doubled too (it went from 24% to 48% in 2018) and it went up again a year later. We see here that the empirical validity of monetarist theory was absent.
For the first paragraph, one could try to run econometric tests for all those variables, at least from my layman perspective. But given that it doesn't pass the smell test (has any country used that in its favor ignoring monetary policy? Also, I have shown there is at least some evidence for the money-price relationship before), I'll try to address what happened in Macri's government and if monetarism (or at least some reasonable extension of it) cannot account for it.
For a complete description of macroeconomic policy on that period, Sturzenegger account is a good one (even if a bit unreliable given he was the central banker for that government and he is considered to have been a failure). The short version is that central banks uses bonds to manage monetary policy and absorb money; given the history of defaults for the country, the Argentinian Central Bank (BCRA) uses its own peso denominated bonds instead of using treasury bonds. At that time period, the BCRA still financed the treasury but the amount got reduced. Also, it emitted pesos to buy dollar reserves, then sterilized them, maybe risking credibility further.
Near the end of 2017 it was evident the government had limited appetite for budget cuts, it had kind of abandoned its inflation target regime and the classic problem of fiscal dominance emerged, as it's shown in the classic "Unpleasant monetarist arithmetic" paper by Wallace and Sargent. Monetary policy gets less effective when the real value of bonds falls, and raising interest rates may be counterproductive in that environment. Rational expectations are needed to complement QTOM.
So, given that Argentina promised to go nowhere with reform, it was expected that money financing would increase at some point in the future and BCRA bonds were dumped in 2018 and 2019 as their value was perceived to have decreased, and so peso demand decreased. It's not that the dollar value increased and inflation followed, but instead that peso demand fell suddenly!
The IMF deal asked for MB growth to be null or almost null but that doesn't say a lot about M2 (which it's the relevant variable here). Without credible policies, the peso demand keeps falling because bonds are dumped even more (see 2019 for a hilariously brutal example of that).
It's not emission per se, but rather that it doesn't adjust properly to peso demand (which is falling). That doesn't mean increasing interest rates is enough to achieve it, following Wallace and Sargent model.
This is less a strict proof that a monetary phenomenon is involved and more stating that the author hasn't shown any problem with that, there are reasonable models for this situation. It doesn't look like an clear empirical failure to me yet.
3 - Of what we are talking about when we talk about emission?
The author mentions many money measures (M0, M1, M2) but it doesn't address it meaningfully as I tried to do above. It feels more like a rhetorical device because there is no point here except "this stuff exists".
Also, it's worth pointing that there are actual criticisms to make to Friedman on those grounds. He failed to forecast US inflation at some points when he switched to M1 instead of using M2, although he later reverted that. Monetarism kind of "failed" there (it also "failed" in the sense that modern central banks don't use money, but instead interest rates as their main tool; "failed" because despite being outdated, it was influential to modern central banking). This is often brought to this kind of discussions like if economics hasn't moved beyond that. For an account of Friedman thoughts on monetary policies and his failures, see this.
4 - Why do many countries print and inflation doesn't increase there?
There is a mention about the japanese situation in the 90s (the liquidity trap) which I have addressed.
The author mentions that many countries "printed" like crazy during the pandemic, and he says:
Monetarism apologists answer, when confronted with those grave empirical problems that happen in "serious countries", that the population "trusts" their monetary authorities, even increasing the money demand in those place despite the emission. Curious, though, it's an appeal to "trust" implying that the relationship between emission and inflation is not objective, but subjective and cultural: an appreciation that abandons mechanicism and the basic certainty of monetarism, because evaluations and diagnostics, many times ideologic, contextual or historical intervene..
That's just a restatement of applying rational expectations to central bank operations. I don't see a problem with that. Rational expectations is not magic, it's an assessment of future earnings by economic actors. Humans may not 100% rational but central banking somehow works on many countries. You cannot just say that people are ideologues and let it at that. What's your model?
Worth noting the author shills for bitcoin a bit in this section, for more cringe.
5 - Are we talking of a physical science or a social science?
Again, a vague mention of rational expectations ("populists and pro market politicians could do the same policies with different results because of how agents respond ideologically and expectatives") without handling the subject meaningfully. It criticizes universal macroeconomic rules that apply everywhere (this is often used to dismiss evidence from other countries uncritically more than as a meaningful point).
6 - How limits work?
The last question to monetarism allows to recognize it something: effectively we can think on a type of vinculation between emission and inflation in extreme conditions. That means, with no monetary rule, no government has the need of taxes but instead can emit and spend all it needs without consequence. We know it's not like that: no government can print infinitely without undesirable effects.
Ok, good disclaimer, but given what he wrote before, what's the mechanism which causes money printing to be inflationary at some point? It was rejected before but now it seems that it exists. What was even the point of the article?
Now, the problem is thinking monetarism on its extremes: without emission we have inflation sometimes, on others we have no inflation with emission, we know that if we have negative emission that doesn't guarantees us negative inflation, but that if emission is radically uncontrolled there will economic effects.
As I wrote above, that's not what monetarism (even on it's simpler form) says, nor a consequence of it. You can see some deviations in low inflation environment but it's not really Argentina's current situation.
Let's add other problems: the elastic question between money and prices is not evident. Neither is time lags in which can work or be neutral. So the question is the limit cases for monetarism which has some reason but some difficulty in explaining them: by which and it what moments rules work and in which it doesn't.
I find the time lag thing to be a red herring. You can observe empirically and not having a proper short/middle run model doesn't invalidate QTOM in the long run. While it may be that increasing interest rates or freezing MB is not effective, that's less a problem of the theory and more a problem of policy implementation.
Conclusion:
I find that the article doesn't truly get monetarism to begin with (see the points it makes about emission and money demand), neither how it's implemented in practice, nor seems to be aware of more modern theories that, while put money on the background, don't necessarily invalidate it (rational expectation ideas, and eventually New Keynesian stuff which addresses stuff like liquidity traps properly).
There are proper criticisms to be made to Friedman old ideas but he still was a relevant man in his time and the economic community has moved on to new, better theories that have some debt to it. I feel most economic discussion about monetarism in Argentina is a strawman of mainstream economics or an attack on Austrians more than genuine points ("monetarism" is used as a shorthand for those who think inflation is a monetary phenomenon more than referring to Friedman and his disciples per se).
submitted by Neronoah to badeconomics [link] [comments]

Barry Silbert in Brookings session: “It’s highly likely that Bitcoin will not be the winner”

Barry Silbert in Brookings session: “It’s highly likely that Bitcoin will not be the winner” submitted by cryptopascal to CryptoCurrency [link] [comments]

Bitcoins From Above Brook Zoro Nico Robin Usopp One Piece B2629 Wallpaper

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Bitcoins Everywhere Inverted Brook Zoro Nico Robin Usopp One Piece B2629 Wallpaper

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Bitcoins From Above Franky Nico Robin Luffy Brook One Piece B2564 Wallpaper

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Is Bitcoin Anonymous? Even though Bitcoin is not entirely anonymous, you can still stay out of trouble when transacting BTC. Third party companies have been born to help Bitcoin users get the anonymity they require. It is called a Bitcoin mixer, and using one is the best way to work with Bitcoin if you are really concerned about your identity.
submitted by bitcoinwallpaper3 to BitcoinWallpaper [link] [comments]

10-25 22:53 - 'Sneak Peak of the New Website Redesign' (linkedin.com) by /u/James_Brooking removed from /r/Bitcoin within 8-18min

Sneak Peak of the New Website Redesign
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Author: James_Brooking
submitted by removalbot to removalbot [link] [comments]

Beyond bitcoin: The future of blockchain and disruptive ... Bitcoin Keys: Trace Mayer & Davincij15 Brookings + Madison Intermediate Ballet Bitcoin and Beyond: Cryptocurrencies Explained Jerry Brito on Bitcoin's organic innovation

Am Dienstag hat die Brookings Institution einen Blogbeitrag geschrieben, in dem Bitcoin mit dem Internet verglichen wurde. Mohit Kaushal, Partner bei Aberdare Ventures, und die Unternehmerin Sheel Tyle erklärten, was die Blockchain ist und warum sie in einem Beitrag für den TechTank-Blog wichtig sein könnte. Bitcoin Private Keys can Take Almost Infinite Years To Crack. Blockchain 5 months ago. 1.5 Times More Bitcoin is purchased by Grayscale Than Daily Mined Coins. News 5 months ago. Facebook finally adding the bulk-delete feature to remove your embarrassing old posts. Latest; Press Release 10 hours ago. Complete Guide to Uniswap by Cafescript . Press Release 2 days ago. The Recent BitMEX Scandal ... „Die Bitcoin zugrundeliegende Distributed-Ledger-Technologie ... ist in der Lage, das Finanzsystem zu verändern, und lässt sich mit dem Internet vor dem Einsatz von Browsern vergleichen.“ – The Brookings Institute. Seit Jahren gibt es in der Branche diesen Hype um die Distributed-Ledger-Technologie. Warum ist aber dennoch so wenig passiert? Niemand wusste so genau, wo man anfangen ... On January 14, the Hutchins Center on Fiscal and Monetary Policy at Brookings explored the future of distributed ledger technology-—what enables the digital currency bitcoin—paying special ... Britain's Central Bank Governor Andrew Bailey giving a speech virtually at a Brookings event on ...[+] September 3. Brookings . Without missing a beat and so that you would not mistake a touch of ...

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Beyond bitcoin: The future of blockchain and disruptive ...

Bitcoin and cryptocurrency are here to stay whether you like it or not: https://www.brookings.edu/blog/techtank/2015/01/13/the-blockchain-what-it-is-and-why-... A prominent developer for Bitcoin sells all of his Bitcoins, and casts doubts on its viability. For the full episode, visit https://twit.tv/tnt/1429. From Brookings' Beyond Bitcoin event. 1/14/2016. This video is unavailable. Watch Queue Queue On January 14, 2016, Brookings convened roundtable technical discussions about the future of distributed ledger technology with industry and policy stakeholders. Non-state-backed, decentralized “cryptocurrencies” such as bitcoin have introduced new paradigms for money movement in which transfers are public but the ide...

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